NHS horror stories, my life as a Twitter fogey, and cricket’s robot generation

Peter Wilby's "First Thoughts" column.

Horror stories about the National Health Service come thick and fast, conveniently for a government that wants to hand it over to private capital. One week, it is chaos in A&E; the next, substandard care at 14 hospital trusts and old folk being ushered to an early grave by the Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP). We should treat these stories with scepticism even when they are apparently validated by official inquiries.

With all the talk of “excess deaths”, you would think that our hospitals had become killers. Yet, as the NHS medical director for England, Bruce Keogh, observes in his report on the 14 “failing” trusts, overall mortality in hospitals has fallen by about 30 per cent over the past decade.

Inquiries, however, rarely conclude that the problems they were set up to address don’t exist and they would be dismissed as whitewashes if they did. Given the emotion and fears surrounding serious illness and particularly death, it’s easy to find allegations of medical neglect. Julia Neuberger’s report on the LCP is replete with phrases such as “some people”, “many people” and “all too often”. There are no references to randomised sample surveys. The inquiry invited submissions from the public (it received 483), talked to 113 people at meetings and looked at hospital complaints. Such evidence should not be ignored but it is naturally biased towards those who suffered bad experiences.

No institution is perfect and anything involving medicine, which is as much an art as a science, will be more imperfect than most. What we don’t know is whether a health service run by private providers would be better.

I offer this snippet: in 2010, the US health department’s inspector general reported that 13.5 per cent of Medicare hospital patients suffered “harm” from “adverse events”, nearly half of them because of care failures. British newspapers love to highlight cases of “wrong-site surgeries”, in which ovaries are taken out instead of the appendix, for example. The United States has 40 of those a week; the UK has about 60 a year. The NHS has failings but they seem relatively few and, by international standards, very cheap.

Guilt by association

What’s in a name? The Neuberger report acknowledges that “many relatives” of patients on the LCP felt their loved ones had had “good deaths”. Yet it recommends dropping the term. “Pathway”, it argues, suggests patients being speeded directly to their coffins. I wonder if “Liverpool” isn’t the greater problem. Thanks partly to the Sun and Boris Johnson, the city has acquired negative associations in the past 25 years. Mention Liverpool and people think of poverty, unemployment, riots, too much drink and a declining football team.

Seen but not heard

The BBC’s director general, Tony Hall, says that he intends to stop actors muttering in the corporation’s dramas. If so, he will be performing a service to theatregoers as well as TV viewers. Actors, it seems, are no longer being taught to articulate their lines clearly and “throw” their voices, largely because the big money is now in TV, where authenticity is thought more important than audibility. Being deaf, I nearly always buy front-row seats at the theatre, but in the West End recently, we sat in the grand circle and my wife, whose hearing is perfect, complained that she couldn’t hear, either. Theatregoers should start a campaign and, at an agreed signal, stand in unison and shout: “Speak up!”

Social outcast

We hear much about how social media companies hold extensive databases on us that could be exploited by governments and corporations. We also hear about their inadequate controls over insulting comments. But I have not noticed discussion of their arbitrary power over users. I returned from holiday to find my Twitter account “suspended”, without warning or explanation. After a polite, emailed inquiry, I was told to look at the rules. I replied I couldn’t see how I had broken them. Two weeks later, someone at Twitter emailed me, saying, “It’s been awhile since we’ve heard from you,” and that “hopefully” the matter had been resolved. It certainly hadn’t, I replied. The account was restored a few days later, still without explanation or apology.

Being an old fogey, I use Twitter spasmodically and was not greatly inconvenienced by its loss. To some users, however, it has become an essential working tool. In a telling example of how technology can restrict rather than widen choice, many feel they must use it because their professional peers do so. We should know more about the Californian geeks who run social media and what redress they offer to those arbitrarily blackballed.

Analyse this

How could Ashton Agar, a 19-year-old cricketer playing his first Test and batting at No 11, make 98, the highest score of Australia’s first innings against England at Trent Bridge? The answer is that, since Agar had played only 16 unremarkable first-class innings, the England coaches, lacking videos of him, could offer bowlers no plans for getting him out. International sides now analyse opponents exhaustively. They produce pie charts, spreadsheets, graphs and other statistical paraphernalia, searching for a batsman’s weakness as assiduously as physicists searched for the Higgs boson. Even the best modern bowlers are robots, programmed by back-room boffins. Without the usual input, they malfunction.

What redress does Twitter offer to the arbitrarily blackballed? Photograph: Getty Images

Peter Wilby was editor of the Independent on Sunday from 1995 to 1996 and of the New Statesman from 1998 to 2005. He writes the weekly First Thoughts column for the NS.

This article first appeared in the 22 July 2013 issue of the New Statesman, How to make a saint

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How gendered are this year’s most popular Christmas present toys?

Meet the groups fighting back against the gendering of children’s toys over the festive season.

You’re a young girl. You go into WH Smith’s to pick out a colouring book for Christmas. You could buy the Girls’ World Doodling and Colouring Book, a "gorgeous gift for any girl". In this, the pictures range "from flowers, fans, feathers, to birds, buttons and butterflies". Or Colouring for Girls: Pretty Pictures to Colour and Complete, where you can colour in "beautiful birds, seashells, cupcakes, pretty patterns and lots more". The counterpart Boys’ Colouring Book has a range beyond buttons and feathers: "Planes, trains and automobiles – plus the odd alien spacecraft".

In the run-up to Christmas, this kind of gendered marketing is rife, particularly finding its way into the predominantly pink colour scheme of girls’ toys.

Take Amazon’s page "2016 Toys for Girls": a pink icecream trolly set, a pink light-up tablet, pink building blocks, pink and purple friendship bracelets and so on.

There are several groups taking action against the "pinkification" of children’s toys. One of these is Let Toys Be Toys, a group that targets large supermarkets with the aim of reducing the gendered marketing used on children’s goods.

The Let Toys Be Toys blog focuses on specific examples of targeted gendering within shops, catalgoues and online. A particularly revealing example of how prevalent this has become in recent years is in two pictures published from the Argos catalogue, one from the Seventies, and one from nowadays. The eye-wateringly pink page from now makes the 1970s page look dour by comparison. The lack of change over four decades of what kind of products are marketed at girls is equally striking:

Despite the efforts of campaign groups such as Let Toys Be Toys, the prevalence of gendering within the highest-rated children's gifts for 2016 is staggering.

Look no further than the Ultimate Christmas Gifts Guide from Toys R Us. One of the most immediately obvious examples is the way in which the pink/blue colour schemes are used to market identical products. This is repeated again and again:

This identical drawing board is uniquely packaged to the binary colour codes that are so common within children's toys stores.

The same applies with this keyboard, where the young girl and boy are pictured almost identically, save for the coordination of their clothes to the colour of their toys.

The message is a hugely limiting one: one that allows little movement away from the binary of pink/blue. The effects of this are longstanding. A recent poll from YouGov shows that "only a third of parents approve of boys playing with Barbies". The data goes on to explain that "while most parents approve of girls playing with toys marketed to boys, a minority of adults approve of the opposite".

Images like this were the inspiration behind Let Toys Be Toys, back in 2012. The campaign began on Mumsnet, the forum for parents, on a section called "AIBU", which stands for "Am I Being Unreasonable?". One parent posted the question: "Am I being unreasonable to think that the gendered way that children’s toys are marketed has got completely out of hand?" The heated discussion that followed led to a sub-section with the founding memebers of Let Toys Be Toys.

This aside, Let Toys Be Toys has made signifcant progess since it began. It targets large stores, focusing on gendered signage both in store and online. In their four years, they have campaigned for signs like "girls' toys" and "boys' toys" to be removed from retailers such as Boots, Debenhams, Morrisons, Toys R Us and TK Maxx. It is the go-to hashtag on Twitter for examples of the often shocking gendering of children’s toys.

"This is ostensibly about toys, but what we’re really talking about is gender stereotypes that shape our children’s worlds in an apparently very unassuming way," says Jess Day, a Let Toys Be Toys campaigner. "It seems very innocent, but actually what we’re doing is giving children very clear instructions about how to be a man and how to be a woman."

These clear instructions work beyond colour coordination: where girls are sold the image of the pink "girly girl", for instance. This is evident in children’s fancy dress costumes. Early Learning Centre’s (ELC) children’s fancy dress range imposes very rigid gender roles. To give examples from the current christmas range:


Credit: ELC

Again, the predominant colour sceme is pink. The roles offered are mainly fairies and princessess: generally make-believe.

“I found it really interesting that there were almost no ads showing girls doing anything," comments Day. "Physically they were very passive. The only physical activity we saw girls doing was dancing. They weren't really moving around much."


Image: ELC

By contrast, young boys are offered the possibility of pretending to be a firefighter, a policeman or a doctor, among other practical, professional roles.

This year's Toys R Us Christmas advert follows on from this, with girls mainly dressed as princesses, and boys dressed as knights and kings. Much like the pink/blue colour scheme that we see all over children's shops, these fancy dress costumes create an unnatural binary. They send out a message that restricts any kind of subversion of these two supposedly polar opposites.

What's more, the subtext is one that is deeply rooted in expectations, building up a picture where careers such as that of a policeman and fireman come more naturally to boys, who have been socialised into these roles from childhood through fancy dress costumes of this type. Instead, girls are later forced to learn that most of us aren't going to become princessess, and none of us fairies – and so the slow process begins to unlearn these expectations.

There are certainly groups who try to counteract this. Manufacturers such as the toy brand IamElemental aims to break down the gendered distinctions between boys' toys and girls' toys, by creating female action figures.

“We always say that we are not anti-doll or anti-princess, but that if you give a girl a different toy, she will tell a different story," says Julie Kershaw, a member of the organisation. "As the mom of two boys, I always say that it’s just as important to put a strong healthy female action figure in a boy’s hand as it is a girl’s”.

Like the campaigners behind Let Toys Be Toys, IamElemental sees children’s toys as the starting point.

“We want kids – both girls and boys  – to internalise these messages early and often,” says Kershaw. “While there are certainly biological differences between girls and boys, gender-specific toys are not a biologically dictated truth. Toys are not “for girls” or “for boys”  – toys are for play; for exploration and creative expression.”

This attitude is ingrained in a child’s early years. Only through reconfiguring the gender sterotypes of the toys we buy for our children can we begin to break down their expectations of how to behave in age. We challenge you this Christmas to avoid these highly gendered products. Below are our three favourite Christmas presents for children this year, for girls AND boys, as approved by Let Toys Be Toys:

Mini Table Tennis (£7.99)


From: The Little Toy Box

Djeco Intro to Origami - Animals (£3.99)

From: Rachel's Toy Shop

Seedling Make Your Own Dino Softie! - Dino(sew)or Kit (£5)


From: Gifts For Little Ones