Who is the new Pope?

Jorge Mario Bergoglio, an Argentinian Jesuit, is the surprise choice - and he has taken the name Francis I.

White smoke from the Vatican conclave has signalled that the new Pope has been chosen.

The elected cardinal, a successor to Benedict XVI, is Jorge Mario Bergoglio. The Argentinian is the first Jesuit to be elected Pope, and has taken the name Francis I.

He told the assembled crowd that the cardinals had looked for a new pope "at the end of the world".

He takes over the official Papal Twitter account, @pontifex, which currently has more than 1.5 million followers, and become head of the world's 1.2 billion baptised Catholics.

The end of the conclave came quicker than expected, after just two days. The swift resolution pleased the thousands crowding into St Peter's Square in Rome, who had been waiting in the rain.

Photos: Getty

The new Pope will face a turbulent Catholic church, as John Cornwell revealed in our cover essay last week.  

The tendency of the two most recent popes to lecture and dictate, rather than be part of a living conversation with their peer group, must be seen as a lost opportunity in a world facing such great socio-economic crises. At the end of After Virtue, pondering the civilising influence of St Benedict on the Dark Ages, Alasdair MacIntyre suggests that the world is in dire need of a “new Benedict”. If the critics are right, Ratzinger was emphatically not he. But then it is unlikely that MacIntyre ever thought that any pope could, on his own, be the answer to the problems of the Catholic Church, let alone those of the world that lies beyond the Vatican.

 

Jorge Mario Bergoglio, before this election. Photo: Getty

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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