US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. So Much for the Nativists (New York Times)

The flurry of visa-related bills making the rounds on Capitol Hill offers further proof that the country cannot live without immigrant labor, says this editorial.

2. Occupy Oakland exits the high ground (San Francisco Chronicle)

Tear gas and masks are the new images of the Occupy movement, not anti-Wall Street placards or speeches, reports this editorial. The street battles in Oakland - and possible police sweeps elsewhere, including San Francisco - have overtaken the cause.

3. The shortcomings of Rick Perry's tax plan (Washington Post)

"More complex, less fair and a larger deficit", according to the Post.

4. How Obama can win reelection (Boston Globe) ($)

Obama won't convince anyone that he has turned the country around, says Joshua Green; but he could justifiably claim that he has fixed many of the problems bequeathed to him by his predecessor.

5. Up from underwater (Los Angeles Times)

According to this editorial, Obama's housing rescue plan is an overdue step that could bring relief to millions of homeowners.

6. With finger in the air, Romney isn't showing he's No. 1 (Chicago Tribune)

GOP presidential candidate waffles on Ohio issue and exposes his indecision, John Kass.

7. The Vatican meets the Wall Street occupiers (Wasington Post)

E J Dionner Jr asks: If our religious leaders won't challenge us to love mercy and do justice, who will?

8. Cop cams could build credibility (Denver Post)

This editorial welcomes Denver's upcoming experiment with police wearing digital cameras, but not only for the usually cited reason that it could improve police accountability.

9. Yes, the GOP field is incredibly weak (Washington Examiner)

Each Republican contender brings some attributes to the table, writes Philip Klein -- but not one of them seems up to the task at hand.

10. Learning while going green on campuses (USA Today)

Ben Glassner says too many campuses fail to teach students about sustainability.

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Will anyone sing for the Brexiters?

The five acts booked to perform at pro-Brexit music festival Bpop Live are down to one.

Do Brexiters like music too? If the lineup of Bpoplive (or more accurately: “Brexit Live presents: Bpop Live”) is anything to go by, the answer is no. Ok, former lineup.

The anti-Europe rally-cum-music festival has already been postponed once, after the drum and bass duo Sigma cancelled saying they “weren’t told Bpoplive was a political event”.

But then earlier this week the party was back on, set for Sunday 19 June, 4 days before the referendum, and a week before Glastonbury, saving music lovers a difficult dilemma. The new lineup had just 5 acts: the 90s boybands East17 and 5ive, Alesha Dixon of Britain’s Got Talent and Strictly Come Dancing fame, family act Sister Sledge and Gwen Dickey of Rose Royce.

Unfortunately for those who have already shelled out £23 for a ticket, that 5 is now down to 1. First to pull out were 5ive, who told the Mirror that “as a band [they] have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.” Instead, they said, their “allegiance is first and foremost to their fans” - all 4our of them.

Next to drop was Alesha Dixon, whose spokesperson said that she decided to withdraw when it became clear that the event was to be “more of a political rally with entertainment included” than “a multi-artist pop concert in a fantastic venue in the heart of the UK”. Some reports suggested she was wary of sharing a platform with Nigel Farage, though she has no qualms about sitting behind a big desk with Simon Cowell.

A spokesperson for Sister Sledge then told Political Scrapbook that they had left the Brexit family too, swiftly followed by East 17 who decided not to stay another day.

So, it’s down to Gwen Dickey.

Dickey seems as yet disinclined to exit the Brexit stage, telling the Mirror: "I am not allowed to get into political matters in this lovely country and vote. It is not allowed as a American citizen living here. I have enough going on in my head and heart regarding matters in my own country at this time. Who will be the next President of the USA is of greater concern to me and for you?"

With the event in flux, it doesn’t look like the tickets are selling quickly.

In February, as David Cameron’s EU renegotiation floundered, the Daily Mail ran a front-page editorial asking “Who will speak for England?” Watch out for tomorrow’s update: “Who will sing for the Brexiters?”

I'm a mole, innit.